Wednesday, March 10, 2010

High Carb, High Fat, Big Ole Southern Casserole

This recipe came from James Villas' cookbook, "My Mother's Southern Kitchen," and he attributed it to the old cook at St Martin's Episcopal Church in Charlotte. I've made a few minor adjustments, and think it's perfect food for a rainy day!  I serve it with a salad to make it feel a little less artery-hardening.....

Annie's Turkey Dressing Bake  (serves 8)

3 c. packaged herb-seasoned stuffing mix
1 small onion, chopped
1 rib celery, chopped
1/2 tsp. poultry seasoning
4 c. diced cooked turkey
1 stick butter
1/2 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
4 c. chicken stock
6 large eggs
Turkey Gravy (your own or purchased)

Mix the stuffing mix, veggies, and poulty seasoning in a bowl, and dump into a greased 9 x 13 pan.  Top with the turkey.  Make a roux of the flour and butter, add salt, pepper, and stock, bring to a boil.  Meanwhile, beat the eggs in a bowl.  GRADUALLY add the hot stock mixture to the eggs (one cup at a time or you'll have egg drop soup!).  Once combined, pour over the turkey mixture and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

Serve with the turkey gravy.  Sort of a "heart attack on a plate," but really good stuff!

7 comments:

  1. my kind of food. mmmmmmmmmm

    But you grew your own onions, right?

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  2. Jim, I raised the turkey and the chicken for the eggs.......

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  3. Sounds great! I love a good casserole.

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  4. I'm tucking this away 'til November ... I think you can subtract calories/fat when you add a salad :)

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  5. That sounds like a great recipe. I will print it off to keep with my web recipes.
    My Grandma had hardening of the arteries, and you are the first person that I have come across that used the term. I am sure that explanation covered really a lot of larger problems that we selectively diagnose. Today she would have been put on blood thinners and they would fight the fat in the veins.

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  6. Jim, in my book the flavours always worth the risk...probably explains the post winter paunch that needs to be worked off!
    The recipe sound delicious and I shall be giving it a go.

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